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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

1 edition of On the origin of the parallel roads of Glen Roy found in the catalog.

On the origin of the parallel roads of Glen Roy

by Nicol, James professor of Natural History, Marischal College

  • 75 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by s.n. in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Terraces (Geology)

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesQuarterly journal of the Geological Society.
    Statementby James Nicol
    ContributionsGeological Society of London
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. [282]-291 ;
    Number of Pages291
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24829343M

    The parallel roads, shelves, or lines, as they have been indifferently called, are most plainly developed in Glen Roy. They extend in lines, absolutely horizontal, along the steep grassy sides of the mountains, which are covered with a mantle, unusually thick, of slightly argillaceous alluvium.   Glen Roy is a classic geosite for ice-dammed lake shorelines, the Parallel Roads, and associated features formed during the Loch Lomond (Younger Dryas) Stade (– ka). The area played a key part in the development of the glacial theory in the early 19th century and continues today to have outstanding scientific value for understanding Cited by: 3.

    Visit the famous ‘Parallel Roads of Glen Roy’. See the evidence for a deep ice-dammed lake during the last ice age. Learn how the landscape was shaped by ice and water; Understand how ice and water created the deep gorge of the River Spean; Learn about the origin and frequency of ice ages. Which best describes the nature of the parallel roads at Glen Roy? They follow the terrain all the way around this valley and other valleys nearby. What feature of the parallel roads seen on Darwin's map best suggests they are natural, not man made?

      The Parallel Roads of Glen Roy, Scottish Highlands, represent a series of ice-dammed proglacial lake shorelines produced during the cold climate of the Younger Dryas (GS1). Darwin, Charles, , 'Observations on the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy.' Plate 1. Previous: 1 of Next: View Description. Page Flip View: View Image & Text: Download: small (x max) medium (x max) Large. Extra Large. large (> x) History of Cosmology - Views of the Stars: History of Engineering & Technology: History of.


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On the origin of the parallel roads of Glen Roy by Nicol, James professor of Natural History, Marischal College Download PDF EPUB FB2

Buy The Parallel Roads of Glenroy: Their Origin and Relation to the Glacial Period and the Deluge (Classic Reprint) on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders The Parallel Roads of Glenroy: Their Origin and Relation to the Glacial Period and the Deluge (Classic Reprint): James Macfadzean: : Books.

In the 18th century, the “Parallel Roads of Glen Roy” became a celebrated feature of the remote Lochaber region. They were called “Roads” because they were initially thought to be ancient hunting roads cut along hillsides that were formerly by: 2.

GwYN Jeffreys observed that no organic remains appear to have been found in these beaches, so as to prove their marine origin. ] XICOL PARALLEL ROADS. Evans agreed with the author as to the difficulties presented by the Lake theory in accounting for the terraces, especially those not in Glen Roy itself, but in the valley of the Spean.

Glen Roy has astonished me ” (Charles Darwin writing to Charles Lyell after his visit to Glen Roy in ; Darwin,p. Introduction The Parallel Roads of Glen Roy, and the neighbouring Glen Spean and Glen Gloy, together form one of the most famous. In a paper on the “Origin of the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy,” read before the Society and published in the Quarterly Journal for AugustI described some physical facts which appeared to me to place their marine origin beyond doubt.

So far. as I am aware, no attempt has been made to answer that : James Nicol. Glen Roy: A landscape fashioned by geology The Parallel Roads of Glen Roy are one of Scotland’s natural wonders. The origin of these remarkable shorelines on the hillsides of Glen Roy, Glen Gloy and Glen Spean has been a source of great fascination to local people, visitors and scientists alike - even attracting the interest of Charles Darwin.

He thought Glen Roy was a former fjord that had been uplifted, and the “parallel roads” were ancient seashores. The next year (), he presented.

The parallel roads of Glen Roy are not roads at all, but are in fact the remains of shorelines created by ice-dammed lakes. In the 18th century the “Parallel Roads of Glen Roy” became a celebrated feature of the remote Lochaber region; they were called “Roads” because they were initially thought to be ancient human constructions; but by the early 19th century most visitors agreed that they must be natural in origin.

Looking North Along Glen Roy: The "Parallel Roads" Can Clearly Be Seen A narrow single-track road turns north off the A86 in Roybridge and runs past St Margaret's Church and Manse. The road runs for nearly ten miles along Glen Roy before coming to an end in the midst of.

They found widespread traces of former glaciers, particularly in the Glen Roy-Glen Spean area, and Agassiz recognised the Parallel Roads to be the shorelines of former ice-dammed lakes, similar to modern features he had observed near Chamonix (Maclaren,Agassiz,Agassiz, ).Cited by: 3.

Observations on the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy, and of Other Parts of Lochaber in Scotland, with an Attempt to Prove That They Are of Marine Origin. Darwin, C Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London ().

–   On the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy, and their Place in the History of the Glacial Period Thomas F. Jamieson Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society, 19,1 Februaryby:   Glen Roy was blocked by the ice of the Lochaber Ice Lobe.

The water behind the ice backed up to three major levels at about ft ( m), 1, ft ( m) and 1, ft ( m) above sea level, that can still be seen on the hillsides as the Parallel Roads. Lochaber is famous for the mysterious parallel lines that can be traced along the sides of Glen Gloy, Glen Roy and Glen Spean.

Parallel Roads Before geologists unravelled the story of ice ages in Scotland, many people believed that the lines were roads built by the ancient kings of Scotland. In the 19th century, the Parallel Roads attracted the attention of many of geology’s founding fathers, including James Geikie, Charles Darwin and Charles Lyell.

The features have an important place in the history of geological science. The extraordinary and hitherto solitary phenomena which I have undertaken to describe, although long known and celebrated by the natives as the traditional works of their great ancestors, remained concealed from the world in general till Mr.

Pennant published a short account of Glen Roy in an appendix to his Tour. A second description appeared in the Statistical Survey of Scotland, since Cited by: 7. Published on This short video explores the curious geological features of the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy in the Scottish Highlands.

The video highlights the. Follow the minor road up Glen Roy which leaves Roybridge at the shop, and pass the small settlement of Bohuntine. A short way further on there is a car park and viewpoint on the left.

From here there is an excellent view of the parallel roads. There are three sets of lines or roads, which were in fact the shores of an ancient loch/5(5). The Parallel Roads in Glen Roy are a naturally occurring geological feature left behind once the Ice Age ended.

The amazing parallel lines are actually the shorelines of the ice-dammed lakes. They are several metres wide, cut into the bedrock of the hillsides and in places covered by remnants of lake beach gravel. With the assistance of William Buckland, Agassiz analyzed the similarities in the Scottish landscape, and specifically the Parallel Roads, with that of Switzerland and uncovered significant proof of glaciations in Glen Roy.

He concluded that the Parallel Roads were once shorelines of an ice-dammed glacial lake.Observations on the parallel roads of Glen Roy, and of other parts of Lochaber in Scotland, with an attempt to prove that they are of marine origin.

[Read 7 February] Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society REVISION HISTORY: Scanned, OCRed, corrected and edited by John van Wyhetextual corrections by Sue Asscher Glen Roy, valley, Highland, W Scotland, E of Loch Lochy.

The Parallel Roads, three terraces on each side of the valley at corresponding heights, are believed to mark receding levels of a lake that once filled the valley.

Source for information on Glen Roy: The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. dictionary.